Vietnamese Telex Windows 10

Supports 64-bit Windows. UniKey 4.3 RC4, 32 bit, ZIP file: Build 180714. Supports 32-bit and 64-bit Windows. UVConverter is a universal command-line Vietnamese encoding converter which supports 13 different charsets/encodings (Unicode, UTF8, TCVN3, VNI) UVConverter is available in both Windows and Linux. UniKey Vietnamese Keyboard UniKey is the most popular Vietnamese keyboard for Windows. The core UniKey Vietnamese Input Method is also the engine for many Vietnamese keyboards in Linux, macOS and iOS. UniKey is free of charge. Source code for the UniKey Vietnamese Input Method is distributed under the GNU General Public License. Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.

  1. Go Telex Win 10
  2. Vietnamese Telex Windows 10 64-bit

Introduction to Vietnamese typing

Learning to type Vietnamese is learning to type its alphabet and its 5 accent marks (or more accurately diacritics). The complete Vietnamese Alphabet and the 5 accent marks are given below:

Vietnamese alphabet

a, ă, â, b, c, d, đ, e, ê, g, h, i, k, l, m, n, o, ô, ơ, p, q, r, s, t, u, ư, v, x, y.

The 5 accent marks

acute accent(“´”), grave(“`”), hook(” ̉ “), tilde(“~”) and dot(“.”)

After a closer look, you would probably agree that what you need to know how to type are just ă, â, ê, ô, ơ, ư and the 5 diacritics.

In order to type those “foreign” symbols using the standard English keyboard, there are many different typing conventions, or formally “input methods”. Nowadays, two of the most widely used conventions are the Telex and the Vni. The main difference between these two conventions is that Telex uses letters (a-z) while Vni uses numbers (0-9) to express the accent marks and the marks on top of the vowels (i.e., to type ă, â, ê, ô, ơ, ư)

There is absolutely no advantage or disadvantage of Telex over Vni when it comes to support: it’s 99% correct to say that whenever Telex is supported, Vni is also supported and vice versa. Once you have learned the 2 conventions, you can decide on your favorite convention.

Installing Vietnamese keyboard

In the Telex Convention, for example, you’ll type the sequence “aa” (two a’s) to get â. Please go ahead and try typing aa on your favorite text editor to see what you get. What did you get?

Of course, it’s …aa!

This is because by default, your computer has yet to support Vietnamese typing, which means that you need to either install a software or enable Vietnamese typing if it’s already shipped with your Operating System (for example, on Mac and Gnu/Linux). Once that piece of software has been properly installed and the mode to type Vietnamese is selected, you’ll get â whenever you type the sequence “aa”. Please refer to the Notes (*) below for more details on the various Vietnamese typing software.

To practice typing Vietnamese online using Telex or Vni typing methods, as you’d be shown below, you can use this no-frill Vietnamese typepad or using the typepad on this site.

Type Vietnamese using Telex

Typing â, ê, ô

As you can observe, these 3 letters all have the circumflex. The rule to type them is hence the same:

  • Telex: Type the underlying letter twice. For example, to get â, your typing sequence is “aa”. Similarly, “oo” for ô and “ee” for ê.

Typing ư, ơ and ă

These first 2 letters share the “horn”; the last one is not quite the same but is close enough, at least according to the Telex way of typing.

  • Telex: type the underlying letter + w. For exaple, to get ư, your typing sequence is “uw”. Similarly, “ow” for ơ and “aw” for ă.

Typing the 5 diacritics

The Telex and Vni conventions for typing the 5 diacritics are summarised in the following table:

Type diacritics (or accent marks):

Diacriticsacute accent(“´”)grave(“`”)hook(” ̉ “)tilde(“~”)dot(“.”)
Telexsfrxj
Example with aá = asà = afả = arã = axạ = aj

And there you go! Congratulation on having learned how to type Vietnamese. But before we conclude, let’s do some exercises to make sure everything has been well understood. How would you type ? Yes, it’s: ơ + the acute accent, so that the Telex typing sequence is “ows”.

Now, how about the word đặng? If your answer is “ddawjng” for Telex, you’ve got it! The only note here is that instead of typing the dot right after the ă (i.e, “awj” for Telex), you can delay the dot till completing the whole word, which means your typing sequence could have been “ddawngj” for Telex. In fact many Vietnamese use this second way of typing the accent mark after completing the alphabet.

Now, if you have asked if it’s possible to defer the “breve” on top of the a till finishing the whole word, which means typing “ddajngw” instead of “ddawjng”, the answer is yes. It’s possible because the typing software, which understands our conventions, would easily figure out that your “w” is to change the a to ă. However, this type of deferral is not used by many people and is also not recommended for the reason that it may actually slow you down. Indeed, when you finish the world, you probably need to “look back” at the word and see what kind of “symbol” you need to add to the vowels. In addition, since ă, for example, is part of the Vietnamese Alphabet, it makes sense that we type it as one single unit.

Type Vietnamese using Vni

Typing â, ê, ô

As you can observe, these 3 letters all have the circumflex. The rule to type them is hence the same:

  • Vni: type the underlying letter + number 6. For example, to get â, your typing sequence is “a6”. Similarly, “o6” for ô and “e6” for ê.

Type ư, ơ and ă

These first 2 letters share the “horn”; the last one is not quite the same but is close enough, at least according to the Telex way of typing.

  • Vni: This convention considers the first 2 as one group and the last letter a different group:
    • ư, ơ: type the underlying letter + number 7. That is, “u7” for ư and “o7” for ơ.
    • ă: type “a8”

Type the 5 diacritics

The Telex and Vni conventions for typing the 5 diacritics are summarised in the following table:

Type diacritics (or accent marks):

Diacriticsacute accent(“´”)grave(“`”)hook(” ̉ “)tilde(“~”)dot(“.”)
Vni12345
Example with aá = a1à = a2ả = a3ã = a4ạ = a5

Let’s do a review excercise to clear things up. How would you type ? Yes, it’s: ơ + the acute accent, so that the Vni typing sequence is “o71”. The reminder here is that we type Vietnamese alphabet letters before typing accent marks.

Now, how about đặng? If your answer is “d9a85ng” for Vni, you’ve got it! The only note here is that instead of typing the dot right after the ă (i.e, “a85” for Vni), you can delay the dot till completing the whole word. In other words, your typing sequence could have been “d9a8ng5” for Vni. Many people find this deferral of typing diacritics help improve typing speed.

As with Telex, it’s possible to defer the “breve” on top of the a till finishing the whole word so that you could also have typed “d9a5ng8”. However, this way of typing is not commonplace as it actually slows you down.

Regardless of what’ve been suggested or advised, as the ultimate goal is to get you type fast, you should use whatever method you feel most comfortable with.

Type Vietnamese on Mac

The great news is that Mac has built-in support for Vietnamese Language. To enable Vietnamese typing support, go to System Preferences and open International. Then select the tab Input Menu.

For Operating System before Leopard, you would see only the Vietnamese option. For OS X Leopard onwards, you have the Vietnamese Unikey option where you can select the Telex or Vni input method as learned above!

Now, for folks with an old Mac OS, the table below shows how to type the special alphabet letters and diacritics in Vietnamese: (Thank you Greg at CJVLang for suggesting this)

Type Vietnamese On Mac before Leopard:

ăâêôgrave(“`”)hook(” ̉ “)tilde(“~”)acute accent(“´”)dot(“.”)đươ
1234567890[]

So to type the word huyền, the sequence would be “huy3n5”.

Type Vietnamese on Gnu/Linux

As for Mac, Gnu/Linux Operating systems such as Ubuntu has built-in support for Vietnamese.

To activate Vietnamese typing support in Ubuntu, for example, go to: System->Administration->Language Support: Click Install/Remove Language and then select Vietnamese to install. And there you go.

Type Vietnamese on Windows

On Windows, you would need to install a software to help you type Vietnamese. But don’t worry, install this piece of software is just a piece of cake.

Below are a couple of Vietnamese typing software that you can use.

  • Unikey: Unikey is probably the most widely used among the Vietnamese;
  • Vietnamese Multilingual Keyboard Driver for Windows: With smart (and fast) typing methods, Han Nom (old Vietnamese) typing among other cool features, it’s worth a try.
  • VPSKeys (from Yale University)

If you don’t know what to use, select the first one: Unikey. Go to Unikey’s download page, and select the latest version to download. As of this writing, the latest version is Unikey 4.0 RC2. After it’s downloaded, everything else would be a series of clicking ‘Next’, typical of installing Windows software.

Insert Vietnamese Accent Marks automatically

Congratulations for having gone through this lesson on how to type Vietnamese using the Telex or Vni convention. You should now be comfortably typing Vietnamese, with some practice of course.

Now that you’ve known the fundamentals, I would like to show you a “secret weapon”: automatically inserting Vietnamese accent marks. Yes, that’s possible through application of a field called Natural Language Processing.

There are a couple of sites providing such a service but the best one is VietnameseAccent.com.

But I only introduce them to you at the end of the lesson because of 2 reasons:

  • They’re not 100% correct. In fact, no artificial intelligence tool can be 100% correct. This means that you can’t rely on them to help you insert the accent marks for Vietnamese.
  • Even if they were 100% correct, you should still know how to type Vietnamese accent marks because you can then type Vietnamese in any editors, not just in the sites mentioned above.

So do play around with them, but you should always treat them as mere convenience tools, not something for you to avoiding learning how to type the Vietnamese accent marks.

Windows users can enable Vietnamese typing without having to download any additional software by following the steps further below. This particular method involves changing your settings so that your current keyboard will have the layout of the Vietnamese keyboard (i.e. the physical keyboard used in Vietnam).

Here's the layout your keyboard would adopt:




(If you would prefer instead to keep the layout of your actual keyboard and use a defined or customizable method to type Vietnamese, skip this page and click here for instructions on installing and setting up software for typing Vietnamese in Word or other word processors.)
Follow these steps to change your current keyboard layout to the Vietnamese keyboard layout as seen above, (keeping in mind that the naming of user interface elements may vary between different versions of Windows):
1. Access the Start menu and select Control Panel.


2. Click on Clock, Language, and Region.


3. Under Region and Language, click on Change keyboards or other input methods.


4. In the Keyboards and Languages tab, click on Change keyboards... .


5. The Text Services and Input Languages window pops up. In the General tab, under the Installed services section, click on Add... .


6. In the Add Input Language window that pops up, type V or scroll down to Vietnamese (Vietnam).
Vietnamese

7. Expand Vietnamese (Vietnam) by clicking on the + to the left of it.


8. Expand Keyboard by clicking on the + to the left of it.

Go Telex Win 10



9. Under Keyboard, select Vietnamese. A check mark should appear in the box next to it.


10. To see what the layout of the Vietnamese keyboard looks like, click Preview... .


11. Close out of the preview and click OK.


12. You’re back in the General tab of the Text Services and Input Languages window. Under Default input language, select the input language you want to use as the default.


13. Click OK.


14. You’re back in the Region and Language window.
Click OK.

15. In your taskbar, usually located near the system icons for clock and power, you should now see a language icon. The icon will display the two-letter language code of the language that you selected to be the default input language (see step 12 above). If you selected English as the default input language, the icon will display EN. If you selected Vietnamese as the default input language, the icon will display VI. To switch to another language-keyboard combination, click on the icon and select the option you want. The icon will display the 2-letter language code of whichever option has been activated.
Tip: To help familiarize yourself with the Vietnamese keyboard layout, you can print out a paper copy of it here and have it handy when you’re typing. Or, you can buy or create your own Vietnamese keyboard stickers and stick them onto your current keyboard. Keyboard stickers are usually available in light-colored lettering for dark keyboards and dark-colored lettering for white keyboards. Apart from the light- or dark-colored lettering, the stickers are transparent so that they don’t cover up the original lettering on your keyboard. If you decide to buy keyboard stickers online, from Amazon.com or Ebay.com for example, make sure they’re stickers you can stick onto individual keys and that you’re not buying what’s called a keyboard overlay. A keyboard overlay is a lettered paper or plastic sheet that covers your entire keyboard. The problem with it is that it’s hard to find the right overlay because it won’t fit onto your keyboard unless it matches your keyboard exactly in size, physical spacing between keys, and so forth.


IMPORTANT NOTE: If you've recently enabled Vietnamese typing and find that your usernames and/or passwords are no longer working, it may be because you are typing in Vietnamese. Read step 15 above to learn how to change input sources. Alternatively, remove the Vietnamese keyboard in your Control Panel if you no longer ne

Vietnamese Telex Windows 10 64-bit

ed it.