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For Windows 64-bit operating systems. This installer application installs Archi to the Windows “Program Files” folder and associates “.archimate” files with Archi. An uninstaller is also provided. Windows 64-bit Portable Zip. For Windows 64-bit operating systems. This is a zip file that does not use an installer. It is probably the most popular ArchiMate modelling tool and is downloaded on average about 5,000 times every month. The latest release of Archi supports the latest version of the ArchiMate language – ArchiMate 3.1. It also includes the ability to exchange models with The Open Group’s ArchiMate exchange format. In the ArchiMate framework described in Section 3.4, it always points from active structure to behavior, from behavior to passive structure, and from active to passive structure. The non-directional notation from the ArchiMate 2.1 Specification and before, which shows the black ball at both ends of the relationship, is still allowed but deprecated. Information Structure Viewpoint Example. The figure below shows an ArchiMate diagram created under the Information Structure Viewpoint. By applying a viewpoint you are allowed to draw an ArchiMate diagram with a subset of ArchiMate elements and relationships, as defined under the viewpoint.

Archimate

An open source modelling toolkit to create ArchiMate models and sketches. Used by thousands of Enterprise Architects throughout the world.

The Archi® modelling toolkit is targeted toward all levels of Enterprise Architects and Modellers. It provides a low cost to entry solution to users who may be making their first steps in the ArchiMate modelling language, or who are looking for an open source, cross-platform ArchiMate modelling tool for their company or institution and wish to engage with the language within a TOGAF® or other Enterprise Architecture framework.
The ArchiMate® modelling language is an open and independent Enterprise Architecture standard that supports the description, analysis and visualisation of architecture within and across business domains. ArchiMate is one of the open standards hosted by The Open Group® and is fully aligned with TOGAF®. ArchiMate aids stakeholders in assessing the impact of design choices and changes.

Archi® fulfils the needs of most Enterprise Architects and associated stakeholders, and has been designed to elegantly provide the main features required for ArchiMate modelling and is used globally by banks, insurance companies, industry, EA consultants, training organisations, universities, and students. It is probably the most popular ArchiMate modelling tool and is downloaded on average about 5,000 times every month.

Download Archi

The latest release of Archi supports the latest version of the ArchiMate language – ArchiMate 3.1. It also includes the ability to exchange models with The Open Group’s ArchiMate exchange format. The exchange format means that you can share your models between different ArchiMate tools and access your model data with other modelling frameworks. The latest release of Archi also contains many new features and fixes. Each new release just gets better and better!

Support Archi

If you find Archi useful in your work and you’d like to help us maintain Archi, a donation would be most welcome, and we accept PayPal, or you could become a patron on Patreon. All development work and support is done for free. A small donation would be much appreciated!


Fully featured

Supporting the ArchiMate® 3.1 language

The Archi® modeller is targeted toward all levels of Enterprise Architects and Enterprise Modellers. It offers an open source software solution to modellers who may be making their first steps in the ArchiMate language. Easily and intuitively create all ArchiMate elements and relations in all of the ArchiMate views. Use the magic connector to create the right connections. Refine your model with user-defined properties, and colourise your diagram with your own colour scheme.

Dynamic Viewpoints

Dynamic Viewpoints let you change the ArchiMate Viewpoint at any time. Any elements that are not permitted for that Viewpoint are “ghosted” out or hidden. Dynamic Viewpoints allow you to change your mind. You don’t have to decide up-front what the Viewpoint will be. You can experiment with different Viewpoints for the same View. And if you decide to keep the Viewpoint, you can simply remove any disallowed elements from the View. You could even set up one master View and apply different Viewpoints in a “what if” scenario.

Hints View

Helping you understand ArchiMate.

If you’re not sure what element to use, or what relationship to connect, simply fire up the Hints view. All ArchiMate elements, relationships and viewpoints are described to provide you with the right information at your fingertips, just when you need it.

The Visualiser

Connecting the dots.

The Visualiser displays the selected model element and all of its relationships with other model elements in a radial-tree graphic. It is the graphical equivalent of the Navigator. Selecting an element or relationship in the Model Tree, the Navigator or in a Diagram View will update the selection in the Visualiser. Drill in to see more connections.

Cross Platform

Windows, Mac or Linux? We’ve got you covered.

Archi is fully cross-platform as it is written in Java on the Eclipse Rich Client Platform. Therefore it works on Windows 7, 8 and 10, Mac OS X, and most Linux distros right out of the box. You don’t have to worry about sharing models across installations. A portable version and an installer version is available for Windows.

Sketch View

Sketching your ideas.

Brainstorm your ideas with elements written on “stickies”. Quickly design and create “soft” models, capturing the essence of your modelling process without worrying about the technicalities of the language. Share and refine your ideas before transforming them to ArchiMate views.

Canvas Modelling Toolkit

Create your own canvas world.

The Canvas Modelling Toolkit provides the tools for you to create and edit your own canvasses. With the Canvas Modelling Toolkit you can design and create re-usable Canvas Templates to share with colleagues or you use it as a pre-design tool to sketch out ideas and models.

ArchiMate® 3.1 Specification
Copyright © 2012-2019 The Open Group

The main hierarchy of behavior and structure elements of the ArchiMate language is presented in the metamodel fragment of Figure 4. It defines these elements in a generic, layer-independent way. Note that most of these elements (the white boxes) are abstract metamodel elements; i.e., these are not instantiated in models but only serve to structure the metamodel. The notation presented in this chapter is therefore the generic way in which the specializations of these elements (i.e., the elements of the different architecture layers) are depicted.

Figure 4: Hierarchy of Behavior and Structure Elements

This generic metamodel fragment consists of two main types of elements: structure (“nouns”) and behavior elements (“verbs”).

Structure elements can be subdivided into active structure elements and passive structure elements. Active structure elements can be further subdivided into external active structure elements (also called interfaces) and internal active structure elements.

Behavior elements can be subdivided into internal behavior elements, external behavior elements (also called services), and events.

These three aspects – active structure, behavior, and passive structure – have been inspired by natural language, where a sentence has a subject (active structure), a verb (behavior), and an object (passive structure).

Figure 5 specifies the main relationships between the behavior and structure elements defined above. For an explanation of the different types of relationships see Chapter 5. In this and other metamodel figures, the label of a relationship signifies the role of the source element in the relationship; e.g., a service serves an internal behavior element.

Figure 5: Behavior and Structure Elements Metamodel

Note: This figure does not show all permitted relationships; every element in the language can have composition, aggregation, and specialization relationships to elements of the same type. Furthermore, there are indirect relationships that can be derived, as explained in Section 5.7. The full specification of permitted relationships can be found in Appendix B.

Note: This figure is to be read as a generic template for the layers of the ArchiMate core (see Section 3.4), but is not applied directly. Each layer defines its own specialized version of this.

4.1.1Active Structure Elements

Active structure elements are the subjects that can perform behavior. These can be subdivided into internal active structure elements; i.e., the business actors, application components, nodes, etc., that realize this behavior, and external active structure elements; i.e., the interfaces that expose this behavior to the environment. An interface provides an external view on the service provider and hides its internal structure.

An internal active structure element represents an entity that is capable of performing behavior.

Active structure elements are denoted using boxes with square corners and an icon in the upper-right corner, or by the icon on its own.

Figure 6: Generic Internal Active Structure Element Notation

An external active structure element, called an interface, represents a point of access where one or more services are provided to the environment.

Figure 7: Generic External Active Structure Elements (Interface) Notation

4.1.2Behavior Elements

Behavior elements represent the dynamic aspects of the enterprise. Similar to active structure elements, behavior elements can be subdivided into internal behavior elements and external behavior elements; i.e., the services that are exposed to the environment.

An internal behavior element represents a unit of activity that can be performed by one or more active structure elements.

Behavior elements are denoted in the standard iconography using boxes with round corners and an icon in the upper-right corner, or by the icon on its own.

Figure 8: Generic Internal Behavior Element Notation

An external behavior element, called a service, represents an explicitly defined exposed behavior.

Figure 9: Generic External Behavior Element (Service) Notation

Thus, a service is the externally visible behavior of the providing system, from the perspective of systems that use that service; the environment consists of everything outside this providing system. The value offered to the user of the service provides the motivation for the existence of the service. For the users, only this exposed behavior and value, together with non-functional aspects such as the quality of service, costs, etc., are relevant. These can be specified in a contract or Service-Level Agreement (SLA). Services are accessible through interfaces.

In addition to this, a third type of behavior element is defined to denote an event that can occur; for example, to signal a state change.

An event may have a time attribute that indicates the moment or moments at which the event happens. For example, this can be used to model time schedules.

Figure 10: Generic Event Notation

Passive structure elements can be accessed by behavior elements.

A passive structure element represents an element on which behavior is performed.

A passive structure element is a structural element that cannot perform behavior. Active structure elements can perform behavior on passive structure elements. Passive structure elements are often information or data objects, but they can also represent physical objects.

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Figure 11: Generic Passive Structure Element Notation

4.2Specializations of Structure and Behavior Elements

The specializations of core elements are summarized in Figure 12. Within each layer, it is permitted to use composition and aggregation relationships between processes, functions, and interactions; e.g., a process can be composed of other processes, functions, and/or interactions.

Figure 12: Specializations of Core Elements

For individual internal behavior elements, a distinction is made between processes and functions.

A process represents a sequence of behaviors that achieves a specific result.

Figure 13: Generic Process Notation

A function represents a collection of behavior based on specific criteria, such as required resources, competencies, or location.

Figure 14: Generic Function Notation

The collective nature of a behavior can be made either implicit (several active structure elements assigned to the same internal behavior via an and junction) or explicit through the use of a collective internal behavior (interaction) that is performed by (a collaboration of) multiple active structure elements.

A collaboration represents an aggregate of two or more internal active structure elements, working together to perform some collective behavior.

Figure 15: Generic Collaboration Notation

This collective internal behavior can be modeled as an interaction.

An interaction represents a unit of collective behavior that must be performed by two or more internal active structure elements, either assigned directly or aggregated in a collaboration.

Figure 16: Generic Interaction Notation

4.3Summary of Structure and Behavior Elements

Table 1 gives an overview of the core elements, their definitions, and their default graphical notation. But note that most of these elements are abstract; they are not used in models but only their descendants in the different layers of the ArchiMate language.

Table 1: Core Elements

Specializations

Definition

Notation

Active Structure

Internal active structure element

Represents an entity that is capable of performing behavior.

Collaboration

Represents an aggregate of two or more internal active structure elements, working together to perform some collective behavior.

Interface (external active structure element)

Represents a point of access where one or more services are exposed to the environment.

Behavior

Internal behavior element

Represents a unit of activity that can be performed by one or more active structure elements.

Process

Represents a sequence of behaviors that achieves a specific result.

Function

Represents a collection of behavior based on specific criteria, such as required resources, competencies, or location.

Interaction

Represents a unit of collective behavior that must be performed by two or more internal active structure elements, either assigned directly or aggregated in a collaboration.

Service (external behavior element)

Represents an explicitly defined exposed behavior.

Event

Represents a state change.

Passive Structure

Passive structure element

Represents an element on which behavior is performed.

4.4Motivation Elements

The core elements of the ArchiMate language focus on describing the architecture of systems that support the enterprise. They do not cover the elements which, in different ways, drive the design and operation of the enterprise. These motivation aspects correspond to the “Why” column of the Zachman framework [5].

Several motivation elements are included in the language: stakeholder, value, meaning, driver, assessment, goal, outcome, principle, and requirement, which in turn has constraint as a subtype. In this section, the generic motivation element is introduced. The more specific motivation elements are described in Chapter 6.

The motivation elements address the way the Enterprise Architecture is aligned to its context, as described by these intentions.

A motivation element represents the context of or reason behind the architecture of an enterprise.

Figure 17: Generic Motivation Element Notation

Motivation elements are usually denoted using boxes with diagonal corners.

Table 2: Motivation Element

Element

Definition

Notation

Motivation element

Represents the context of or reason behind the architecture of an enterprise.

4.5Composite Elements

Composite elements consist of other concepts, possibly from multiple aspects or layers of the language. Grouping and location are generic composite elements (see Figure 18). Composite elements can themselves aggregate or compose other composite elements.

Figure 18: Composite Elements

3.0

The grouping element aggregates or composes concepts that belong together based on some common characteristic.

The grouping element is used to aggregate or compose an arbitrary group of concepts, which can be elements and/or relationships of the same or of different types. An aggregation or composition relationship is used to link the grouping element to the grouped concepts. Grouping elements can also have other relationships to and from them, as shown in Appendix B.

Figure 19: Grouping Notation

Concepts may be aggregated by multiple (overlapping) groups.

One useful way of employing grouping is for modeling Architecture and Solution Building Blocks (ABBs and SBBs), as described in the TOGAF framework [4].

Another useful application of grouping is for modeling domains. For example, the TOGAF framework [4] Glossary of Supplementary Definition defines Information Domain as: “grouping of information (or data entities) by a set of criteria such as security classification, ownership, location, etc. In the context of security, Information Domains are defined as a set of users, their information objects, and a security policy”.

Note: The use of grouping is not to be confused with creating views on the architecture (Section 14.3). Although like a view it comprises concepts that belong together for some reason, it does not provide a separate visualization of these concepts. Moreover, groupings are used within architecture views to provide additional structure to an architecture model and its visualization.

Example

In Example 1, the “Grouping” element is used to aggregate a conglomerate of two processes and an object that together realize a service (both with nesting and explicitly drawn aggregation relationships).

Example 1: Grouping

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Note: Grouping does not work with derivation of relationships (Section 5.7). However, its semantics do imply that a relationship from or to a group should be interpreted as a collective relationship with the group’s contents. In the example, the implied meaning is that the contents of the group together, or parts thereof, realize the service. However, this is not always easily expressed in simple derivable relationships.

A location represents a conceptual or physical place or position where concepts are located (e.g., structure elements) or performed (e.g., behavior elements).

The location element is used to model the places where (active and passive) structure elements such as business actors, application components, and devices are located. This is modeled by means of an aggregation relationship from a location to structure element. A location can also aggregate a behavior element, to indicate where the behavior is performed. This element corresponds to the “Where” column of the Zachman framework [5].

Figure 20: Location Notation


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Downloads

Downloads of the ArchiMate documentation are available under license from the Download link within the ArchiMate information web site. The license is free to anyorganization wishing to use ArchiMate documentation entirely for internal purposes.A book is also available from The Open Group Library as document C197.

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ArchiMate is a registered trademark of The Open Group.